Book Review: Erebus by Steven Bird

Book Review: Erebus by Steven BirdErebus: An Apocalyptic Thriller by Steven Bird
Narrator: Kevin Pierce
Published by Self-published on 10-11-17
Genres: Horror, Post-Apocalyptic, Zombies
Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
Format: Audiobook
Source: Narrator
Buy on Amazon/Audible
Goodreads
Overal Rating: three-half-stars

Despite the extreme conditions around the crater of Mount Erebus, life exists. Life does not travel to Erebus by way of birds or other plants or animals, but from deep within the Earth itself. Ascending from the dark world beneath Antarctica, microbial life arrives at the surface, only to find itself trapped within the volcano, confined by the icy, lifeless prison that surrounds it.

Today, on the steep and icy slopes of Mount Erebus, can be found a rugged team of scientists, researchers, and mountaineers carrying out their work in one of the harshest and most remote parts of the planet, at a facility known as the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory, or simply MEVO. These professionals, tough enough to brave the extreme climate of Mount Erebus, include experts in the fields of gravity and magnetotellurics, volcanology, geophysics, and even astrobiology.

These doctorate-level professionals travel each year from several major universities such as Cambridge, Missouri State, the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the University of Washington to study Erebus, as well as the unique environment it has created for itself in one of the most remote places on Earth. They are assisted by a professional mountaineer, as well as graduate students from their respective institutions who study under them.

The researchers at MEVO, when not on the mountain at the research camp simply called the Lower Erebus Hut, are based out of McMurdo Station. Mac-Town, as McMurdo Station is fondly referred to by its residents, was founded by the U.S. Navy in 1956. What was initially called Naval Air Facility McMurdo is now simply McMurdo Station. McMurdo Station is currently run by the United States Antarctic Program and is governed by the Antarctic Treaty, signed by forty-five world governments. The Antarctic Treaty regulates daily life at McMurdo, as well as the research conducted there.

In many respects, the inhabitants of McMurdo Station are on their own on the vast and remote continent of Antarctica. This is especially true during the winter months, when most of the station’s one thousand residents return to warmer climates, leaving behind a skeleton crew of only two hundred to face the rigors and potential horrors of life at the bottom of the world—ALONE.

A team of scientists are working at Mount Erebus, in Antarctica, and are ready to leave for the season, but strange events will make this difficult.

Erebus is a zombie novel with a different setting than the typical zombie stories. Probably this is why I had troubles enjoying it, since I expected something a little bit different.

There are many characters in this story but none of them are fully developed, which cause me not to really care for them. The dialogs sounded forced and I was not convinced by the characters’ interactions. There is plenty of action though, and many stressful and gore moments for these characters, so it is still quite entertaining.

What I enjoyed most was the narration. Kevin Pierce delivered excellent characters’ interpretations and kept me interested in the story, even though it was not my cup of tea.

I received a copy of this book in audio format from the narrator in exchange for an honest review.
Story (Plot)
three-stars
Narration
four-stars
Overall: three-half-stars

My name is Elena. Since I was a little child I loved science fiction and fantasy, and I can’t resist to a good novel. In 2015, while wait I started to listen to audiobooks and I discovered the pleasure in being able to read while doing my daily tasks, so there’s always an audiobook playing on my phone. If you see me with my Bluetooth headphones on, please be gentle, I get easily startled.

I live with my boyfriend, which I met during my six year stay in Belgium, two cockatiels, five lovebirds, and two Gouldian finches in Madrid, Spain; and I like to spend my free time knitting and sewing while listening to audiobooks.

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